Living History

When I was a kid, my favorite time of the year was summer. My second favorite time of the year was fall.

In the summer and at Thanksgiving, I was lucky enough to go on road trips with my family, to visit Vermont, New Hampshire, and Virginia.

I got to see my beloved cousins and enjoy the great outdoors while camping and visiting resorts, thanks to our grandfather.

One of our trips was to Manassas Battlefield when I was pretty young. I remember there being a lot of walking, and a lot of bugs.

Whenever we all, as a family, got to one of the monuments at Manassas, I just wanted to rest. But the joy of pushing a button on an interactive display kept me going. I push the button, and someone speaks!

When I pushed the button, a tired voice would come out of the monument, a tired man tired of battles would speak to me, and tell me to turn my head and look around at the ground on which he fought. He’d tell me exactly what he saw, that day, that time, way back when. He’d tell me what hardships he went through, and how doubtful he was about his chances to survive.

Living history.

I would hate to see the day that any of us Americans turn our back on history, no matter how much we might not like it.

I would hate to see the day when we silence the voices of those who walked this earth before we did.

I would hate to stop learning and trying to seek answers, when that should be our sole purpose here on earth.

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Fabric From The Past-Toile de Jouy

Trkingmomoe's Blog

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Toile de Jouy simply means “cloth made in Jouy en Josas,” a village in southwest France.  This type of cloth was soon just called by this name even though it was made in other countries. The factory became famous because of it’s monochromatic prints of scenes with people in the French country side.  Come join us as we explore this fabric that began in 1760 and is still produced today even though the original factory closed in 1843.

The factory was founded in 1760 by Christophe-Philippe Oberkampf.  He was a descendant of family of Bavarian dyers.  He was inspired by the traditional Indian printing techniques. In 1686 France banned the Indian fabrics both the import and making of them.  This was not lifted until 1759. France was behind in this technology of this very popular fashion in fabrics. Oberkampf left Germany and started the factory.  Other countries that was printing…

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Bárðarbunga – Nature of the beast

VolcanoCafé

Dyngjujökull. Photograph by Eggert Norddahl. Used by explicit permission. If you wish to use the image contact Volcanocafé via our email. Dyngjujökull. Photograph by Eggert Norddahl. Used by explicit permission. If you wish to use the image contact Volcanocafé via our email.

First let me write one thing, and that is that we are not in Kansas anymore. And with that I mean that we are in totally uncharted country. Icelandic Met Office has the best volcanologists on the planet, and they pretty much never make a mistake. They are quite simply the best and their reputation at this site is set in solidified lava.

So, when people like that in an hour first states that a small eruption has started and an hour later recant on the statement it does not hamper our confidence in their abilities, it is instead a sign of how “out there” what we are seeing right now really is.

What is happening now is really like if you walked down a familiar street and turn…

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Bárðarbunga loves Grimsvötn = True

This is extremely interesting. It is worth reading.

VolcanoCafé

Photograph by Eggert Norðdahl. All rights reserved and used under permission. Photograph by Eggert Norðdahl. All rights reserved and used under permission.

I once again reiterate that it is Icelandic Met Office and Almannavarnadeild ríkislögreglustjóra that has the authority to issue warnings for Iceland in regards of eruptions and jökulhlaups.

For airborne ash advisories it is in the following order London VAAC and IMO that issues advisories. That being said here follows a brief update upon what is happening in Bárðarbunga and Grimsvötns fissure swarms.

Volcanic love in the ground

Who would have thought that the two largest volcanoes of their type on earth could make love to each other? Well, let me expound a bit on how they do it physically. For anyone who is a bit sensitive, this is where you should stop reading. It will get very graphical.

Since the seismic swarm started there has been quite a lot of confusion about what is going on, and where…

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Kneel Down Bread #Recipe

This is for you Flowerchild. Some really interesting stuff on this site.

Lisa's Blog

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Also known as Navajo tamales—this is a staple in the Navajo diet and a healthier alternative to fry bread.

7 ears fresh corn
2 tablespoons shortening
1 cup water
Salt

Heat oven to 350 degrees F.

1. Scrape corn kernels from cob with a sharp knife, reserving husks. Use the dull side of the knife to scrape the cob and release the corn milk.

2. Grind kernels in a blender and transfer to a bowl. Add shortening, salt to taste, and water only enough to make a paste.

3. Divide the mixture equally into seven husks. Lay out the husk with the natural curl facing up to enclose the filling. Spoon the filling lengthwise into the center of the husk. Using strips of husks, tie both ends. Carefully bend the husk in half to tie the two ends together. Wrap husks in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet…

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Quilted Falling Leaves Bath Mat

I thought you would enjoy this bathroom quilt,

Trkingmomoe's Blog

A wonderful quilted bathmat for your bathroom.  We have lots of patterns for quilted items for the house but it is unusual to find a pattern for the bathroom.  Falling leaves bathmat is a fun quilt to make.

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Florence La Ganke was hired by Nashville Banner in 1928 to create quilting patterns every week for the newspaper.  She created the Nancy Page quilt club, a fictitious group of quilters who would meet once a week with Nancy Page to learn a new pattern and quilt. She would write a interesting story each week about this fictitious group of women who lives was similar to the lives of women who read the column.  Readers became just as interested in their lives as they did in the patterns. The early days of the column most of the patterns were block patterns.  One of them was a maple leaf pattern that was called…

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