Computer Memory

An early memory core frame from IBM main frame before solid state. Thought you all would like to see this. Look at all the weaving.

rona black photography

Computer Memory by Rona Black

An abstract macro photograph of a Ferrite Memory Core plane from an early IBM mainframe computer. This grid is made up of fine wire threaded through tiny magnetic ferrite rings (cores). Magnetic core memory, a type of random-access memory (RAM), was introduced in 1955 and succeeded in the 1970s by solid-state memory in integrated circuits.

The Museum of Modern Art has three in its permanent collection, but none on display.

View original post

How to Make High Efficiency Liquid Laundry Soap for Pennies.

It saves a lot of money and easy to make.

Momoe's Cupboard

DSCN1806

When I was really young in the early 1950’s I remember helping my mom make laundry soap out of Fels-Napha bar soap, Octagon bar soap or Ivory bar soap. Octagon is no longer being made. For baby diapers she would use Ivory bar soap. She would make it up in a bucket every couple of months. She would grate it and cook it and mix it up in a bucket of water. I never thought to ask her about it later in life. It was just something that was history along with her Maytag Ringer Washer. I can still smell that soap in my mind.

Like women of her generation she became attached to the lunchtime stories or also call soap operas because they were sponsored by soap manufactures. Television was the new exciting thing to have in the home. They came on at noon until one o’clock. Each one…

View original post 2,163 more words

Fabric From The Past-Toile de Jouy

Momoe's Cupboard

DSCN1465

Toile de Jouy simply means “cloth made in Jouy en Josas,” a village in southwest France.  This type of cloth was soon just called by this name even though it was made in other countries. The factory became famous because of it’s monochromatic prints of scenes with people in the French country side.  Come join us as we explore this fabric that began in 1760 and is still produced today even though the original factory closed in 1843.

The factory was founded in 1760 by Christophe-Philippe Oberkampf.  He was a descendant of family of Bavarian dyers.  He was inspired by the traditional Indian printing techniques. In 1686 France banned the Indian fabrics both the import and making of them.  This was not lifted until 1759. France was behind in this technology of this very popular fashion in fabrics. Oberkampf left Germany and started the factory.  Other countries that was printing…

View original post 972 more words

History of Pig Picking Cake

Yummy cake that can be adapted using sugar free ingredients and made also in a 9 in, x 13 in. baking pan. Enjoy!

Momoe's Cupboard

DSCN1064

My daughter always talked about a wonderful cake called Pea Pick’n Cake when she was young.  The only problem was the mother who made the cake would not share the recipe.  That was before Paula Dean and internet.  This was not uncommon for recipes to held close as a cook’s secret .   It was done to protect their special statues as to being asked to make or be paid to make it.   So I paid her one time to make it for her birthday.  I had dropped my cake plate off so the cake could be used and paid her.  When I picked the cake up, it didn’t take me but a few minuets to realize that it was a Florida Sunshine Cake that I had made before.  Some of the other names for this cake is Celestial Snow Cake, Orange Pineapple Cake and Pig Lick’n Cake.

How…

View original post 397 more words

Kneel Down Bread #Recipe

This is for you Flowerchild. Some really interesting stuff on this site.

Lisa's Blog

kneeldownbread1

Also known as Navajo tamales—this is a staple in the Navajo diet and a healthier alternative to fry bread.

7 ears fresh corn
2 tablespoons shortening
1 cup water
Salt

Heat oven to 350 degrees F.

1. Scrape corn kernels from cob with a sharp knife, reserving husks. Use the dull side of the knife to scrape the cob and release the corn milk.

2. Grind kernels in a blender and transfer to a bowl. Add shortening, salt to taste, and water only enough to make a paste.

3. Divide the mixture equally into seven husks. Lay out the husk with the natural curl facing up to enclose the filling. Spoon the filling lengthwise into the center of the husk. Using strips of husks, tie both ends. Carefully bend the husk in half to tie the two ends together. Wrap husks in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet…

View original post 42 more words

Pushed to the edge and really pissed off …

Hunger March – flickr/wikimedia commons

My old education institution in Florida – The Univ. Of Central Florida that was originally called Florida Technological Univ. – has had it’s own brush with a plot for mass violence. The person who was plotting this however committed suicide before carrying it out. Thought he did have the required implements of destruction.

UCF police said they received a fire alarm call around 12:20 a.m. As they responded to that call, police then received a 911 call reporting a man with a gun.

When police arrived, they found a student with what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound. They also found a bag of improvised explosive devices, along with a handgun and an assault weapon. – Central Florida News 13

We may never really know the motivations behind this individual or his actions and proposed actions but it’s safe bet is was some personal problem or agenda that drove him to it.

There a those who like to see such situations as some idealistic political and/or religious or some other kind of plot. In most cases those who are involved are just people who feel they have been pushed too far and are generally just really pissed off and desperate. Desperation can drive people to do things and behave in a manner they would not under other circumstances.

If one looks at the history to most political and/or economic upheavals, they were generally started by people who had “Had enough” and were desperate. Even the Russian revolution caught Lenin by surprise when it began even though he and others had plotted the over throw of the Tzar, it was a spontaneous event by desperate people that initiated it. The same for the French revolution and nearly all other such situations.

And now with the current situation in Europe and the EU ministers decision on the Cyprus bank bail outs, they are sowing and fertilizing the seeds of another upheaval.

There’s been a great deal of discussion of how the deal came about, with a particularly detailed account at the Wall Street Journal. The new stance at the creditor nations and the ECB is that there will be “private sector participation” which is bureaucrat-speak for haircuts to the people who funded the banks. And in the fracas over renegotiating the pact so as to make it less unpalatable to the locals, the Eurozone officials have made clear they don’t care how Anastasiades skins this particular cat as long as he comes up with €5.8 billion from local deposits. Banks were due to be closed Monday on Cyprus for a holiday; officials are now considering imposing a bank holiday on Tuesday. Funds have been frozen in the meantime, producing what is likely to be the emblematic photo of this crisis, of a man trying to break into his bank branch:

. . . . .

Now the EU officials could easily calm nervous depositors by announcing an ECB-backstopped deposit guarantee, instead of the current national system which depends on not-exactly-credible central banks. Germany and its fellow surplus countries have hesitated about proceeding with the necessary steps to further economic integration (notice how the plan to implement eurozone wide bank supervision, which Germany insisted was a precondition to Eurozone-level deposit guarantees, has languished?). Germany is trying to maintain policies that are contradictory: it wants to continue to have large trade surpluses, yet not fund its trade partners; its wants debtors to meet their obligations, yet refuses to allow either enough in the way of fiscal deficits or monetary easing to keep debtor countries from falling into deflationary spirals, which assure default. Germany’s failure to relent on any of these conditions means that what breaks will be the financial system. – Naked Capitalism

It took FDR meeting with the heads of the unions and communists and socialist parties to convince him that this country was very close to another revolution in the 1930s. It was this sort of situation that brought Hitler to power and also brought down a number of leaders in other countries. People are not stupid and when they see that they are being sacrificed for the good of those in the upper crust..when they feel they have no say or recourse…when they feel desperate, they will eventually take matters into their own hands.

The PTB need to realize and be aware that it’s groups of highly desperate and pissed of people that will force a change in the current situation for good or bad. Not some high minded organized plot by some subversive element. Though these elements will often take credit for it, they generally are not the instigators.

Going There

Women in binders?

When Romney uttered the phrase “Women in binders” I absolutely could not stop myself from thinking about the Chinese custom of foot binding for women.

Foot binding in China was outlawed in 1912 and in the 21st century there are only a few ‘outlaws’ left to bear witness to this awful custom. A hundred years. A hundred freaking years! It takes that long to erase this kind of crushing (literally bone crushing) kind of subjugation of women.

The next thing I thought was, under a Romney administration, will women lose what they have gained?

I’m not even talking about making further advances. I’m talking about being able to keep what we already have; the economic, social and personal gains. I fear a Romney administration will chip away at those until we are back in 1912 with our feet bound and our ability to walk proud once again crippled.

 

cross-posted at dagblog.com

In Cleveland Public Transportation is for Black People

Cleveland Trolly 1947 – flickr

Cleveland’s public transportation began like nearly all of the urban areas in this country. First with horse drawn cars and then a few cable cars and then electrified with electric trolly cars. Cleveland had electric trolleys up until the 1940s when they began to replace them with electric buses – so called trackless trolleys. Cleveland had trackless trolleys up until the last line was converted to diesel buses in 1962. The Lorain Av. Line on the west side of town. Contrary to popular belief, the city’s decision to got the diesel bus route was because of the the new heavy rail system that was to be expanded to the airport. The first in the country to do so. It was feared that the city could not provide enough electric power for both the electric buses and the heavy rail. Continue reading “In Cleveland Public Transportation is for Black People”