10 Things Most Americans Don’t Know About America

April 18, 2014 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on Finnish Perspective:

This is a re-post of an essay I got as a link from a Facebook friend . Probably one of the more honest ones I have read.

Imagine you have a brother and he’s an alcoholic. He has his moments, but you keep your distance from him. You don’t mind him for the occasional family gathering or holiday. You still love him. But you don’t want to be around him.
This is how I lovingly describe my current relationship with the United States. The United States is my alcoholic brother. And although I will always love him, I don’t want to be near him at the moment.

I know that’s harsh, but I really feel my home country is not in a good place these days. That’s not a socio-economic statement (although that’s on the decline as well), but rather a cultural one.

I realize it’s going to be impossible…

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Small Army Now Fighting Siberian Wildfires in April

April 15, 2014 § Leave a comment

trkingmomoe:

I find this interesting. Russia and Eastern Europe is in a drought condition. The drought started in 2010 and was a major reason for unrest in that area. I you think only the South West is in a drought.

Originally posted on robertscribbler:

Siberia. A land that, during the 20th Century, typically remained locked in ice well into early June. A land where a typical April was still more cold and harshly frozen than the rest of the world in winter.

But, over recent years, Siberia has been experiencing earlier and earlier thaws as average temperatures for the region jumped by about .4 degrees Celsius each decade. As the land’s permafrost began to draw back, it unlocked billions of tons of a peat-like under-layer. Organic material sequestered over hundreds of thousands of years of freezing conditions.

In moist areas, this carbon-rich layer produced methane gas as it thawed. In dry areas, its moisture steadily leeched out, creating a zone of highly combustible material beneath Siberia’s grasslands and forests.

By the mid-2000s enough of these flammable zones had been liberated to result in an increasingly severe fire hazard for much of Russian Siberia. At…

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A La Ronde Embroidery

April 15, 2014 § Leave a comment

trkingmomoe:

This is just beautiful hand work. Enjoy.

Originally posted on Whimsical Places:

Late Victorian Nightdress

Broderie Anglaise single bedspread.
1800-1991

20c Firescreen embroidered in stranded cotton

Embroidery of Orpheus
Wool
1600-1700

1747 linen quilt
7ft square
Coloured silks
French knots, shief and lattice stitch
Background Italian quilting in back stitch
Documents suggest the quilt was a wedding present and took 3 women 2 years to make

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To the Brother I Almost Had

April 15, 2014 § 1 Comment

There is not a day goes by
that I don’t miss our Keith
The conversations, the sudden laughter
the jokes about my teeth

The brother I lacked was there beside me
We’d talk about anything
At five past six he’d shake all hands
Give a kiss upon the cheek

If I had known how short the time’d be
that he’d be sitting there, beside me
I would’ve taken an hour to tell him
just how loved and missed he’d be

Keith, top on, top on, my friend
I’ll love you to the very end
Your honesty, your vivid eyes
your smile, live on with me

There is not a day goes by
that you are not with me

A Cold, Rainy Friday Afternoon at the Haikulodeon 4-12-2013

April 11, 2014 § 1 Comment

trkingmomoe:

This is one of my favorites. Mr, Smith is having trouble with his eyes right now. I hope his vision gets better.

Originally posted on The haikulodeon:

Here’s this week’s heap of haikus:

 

Warmed-over coffee
fills my mug like an old friend
who slept on the couch.

 

————————————–

 

An island sunset,
the sky aglow with passion …
here I sit … alone.

 

————————————–

 

 Know above all things …
That no-one can rule your thoughts.
Your Life’s yours to live.

 

————————————-

 

Dogwood trees in bloom!
Spring’s celebration of joy
in Riverside Park.

 

—————————————

 

Double haiku:

Tulip bulbs planted
upside down, still find a way
to reach the surface.

 

(I don’t mean China,

Where they hang like chandeliers

and fall out of beds.)

 

——————————————

 

Texting’ at Starbucks;
The Algonquin Roundtable
For witless slackers.

 

—————————————-

 

 A chill in the air.
I go back in my house to
look for my jacket.

 

—————————————–

 

Boisterous hellos!
But chats with “friends” will end with
“promises” to call.

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From Wireless to Wireless

April 9, 2014 § Leave a comment

Originally posted on Finnish Perspective:

Wireless – via flickr

Communication has from the first been a major priority of humans. From the early days of travelling Minstrelsthat oft times use the major news of the day in their repertoire. To the printing press and the first “Newspapers.” But until the early 19th century and the advent of the telegraph, one could hardly call this news. It could take days, weeks even months for any information the travel any distance.

Which more appropriately puts it under the heading of recent history. There were various attempts at signalling devices but most were limited in distance, cumbersome to use, complicated, unreliable and therefore of little improvement over just carrying the message there by Pony Express. By the mid 1800s a number of electromagnetic methods of sending messages were being developed.

The one adopted here was one that Samuel B. Morse designed. Initially limited in distance…

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Return of the Sand Hill Cranes

April 9, 2014 § 2 Comments

trkingmomoe:

Please enjoy. I know you will like this.

Originally posted on susan sink:

During National Poetry Month (April), my inbox and FB page get filled up with poems. I love it. It’s a great time to write poems, and I’ve been working for a week to get this one in shape. It’s still shaggy, but it is time to post!

sand hill cranes adjusted

Return of the Sand Hill Crane

At the close of this and every long winter
when the length of the day
and height of the sun say more
than the still-frozen ground,

we hope you will return to us,
find the small, snowy patch
of wetland shining like a tiny hand mirror
to the sky, the particular reed-pocked
marsh with its few blue puddles
just south of our house.

And then, during a late March snowstorm
as I am planting pepper seeds
in a hive of pots on the windowsill
with heat to trick them awake,
you announce your arrival
with rolling chortles…

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